Tag Archives: Peyton Manning

Maybe the Gulfs Will Wash Us Down

Peyton Manning was not Homer’s Odysseus but Tennyson’s Ulysses.

Posted in Tennyson (Alfred Lord) | Also tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Seahawks: Unleashed, Endlessly Hungry

Mary Oliver’s poem about hunting hawks about sums up last night’s Super Bowl.

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Is Peyton Manning Pitted against Puck?

Tomorrow’s Super Bowl drama may be forces of order vs. forces of chaos. Or it may involve Denver trying to outwit a trickster Puck-like team.

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Competing Heroic Narratives in Super Bowl

One Super Bowl narrative: Manning as the return of the king. Another narrative: Manning as Laius blocking the way of the next generation. Plus: Belichick-Welker in Oedipal drama.

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Zeus Predicts that Broncos Will Win

A passage in the Odyssey forecasts that Peyton Manning will win the Super Bowl.

Posted in Homer | Also tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Mourning the Colts’ Loss

The Indianapolis Colts’ playoff loss brings to mind a childhood poem, “Noonday Sun,” about losing a colt. Peyton Manning can also be regarded as a lost colt.

Posted in Jackson (Kathryn and Byron) | Also tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Return of King Peyton

The excitement over Peyton Manning is like that of the townspeople for Thorin Oakenshield in “The Hobbit.”

Posted in Tolkien (J.R.R.) | Also tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

Manning vs. Brady, Hector vs. Achilles

Once again Manning and Brady square off, reminding us of Achilles and Hector.

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Peyton Manning and the Maltese Falcon

“The Maltese Falcon” captures the existential absurdity of Peyton Manning in a Broncos’ uniform.

Posted in Hammett (Dashiell) | Also tagged , , | 3 Comments

Fed, Peyton: Made Weak by Time & Fate?

Peyton Manning and Roger Federer, in the twilight of their careers, bring to mind Tennyson’s Ulysses.

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Après Peyton, le Déluge

News that Peyton Manning may be out for part or all of the upcoming football season puts me in mind of the future of the Geats after Beowulf’s death.

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What to Make of a Diminished Peyton

Sports Saturday “The question that he frames in all but words,” Robert Frost writes in his “Ovenbird” sonnet, “is what to make of a diminished thing.”  This poem has always had a special place in my heart. The ovenbird is not a bird that sings when June is bustin’ out all over. Rather, it is […]

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Manning vs. Brady, Hector vs. Achilles

Sports Saturday Tomorrow will witness the fiercest rivalry in American football—and maybe in American sports—as Peyton Manning of the Indianapolis Colts travels to Boston to play against Tom Brady of the New England Patriots. Many are beginning to believe that football has never seen a quarterback rivalry that matches this one. Which of the two […]

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Never Favre from the Madding Crowd

Sports Saturday He’s baaaak!  The fabled quarterback who has played more consecutive games than anyone in the history of football, the prima donna who each offseason plays maddening games with the football world about whether or not he’s retiring, the holder of virtually every scoring record who last year had his best season ever, the […]

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